}

May 4, 2015

CROWDS SWARM TOWER HILL BOTANIC GARDEN FOR THE AMERICAN PRIMROSE SOCIETY AND THE DAFFODIL SOCIETY SHOWS

'MOON GLOW' X 'TWIGGY' IS THE AWARD WINNING CROSS BY JUDITH SELLERS FROM NEW YORK STATE REALLY, CAN ANY PRIMROSE COMPETE WITH THIS BEAUTY? GASP- DOVE GREY AURICULA IS SUBLIME.

Ever so briefly, as I am so tired - which isn't good, because I have a long week and weekend ahead of with the National meeting of the North American Rock Garden Society which I leave for tomorrow in Michigan, but I wanted to share some pics from this past weekend which was stupendous - both weather-wise and plant-wise. Spring has finally arrived, with temperatures reaching into the 70's all weekend, perfect for our big party that kicked off the National Primrose Society show held in conjunction with the Seven States Daffodil Society show both held at Tower Hill Botanic Garden this weekend.

I won't bore you with too many details, as this is an annual event which I write about on this blog, but this year was so fine, with so many auricle primroses entered ( the fancy ones with farina white rings on them and so rarely seen here in America) and the daffodil show which had more entries than they've seen in many years, both shows were a success.


My friend John Lonsdale spoke on Saturday. I think I last saw him a few years back in Portland at a NARGS winter study weekend when we escaped to have some tacos.  I usually stop in to see him when we are near his home in PA which happens to be very near where we take the dogs for the national terrier show, which allows me me to stock up on some of his many cyclamen species - (I think he grows them all). Johns plants are extraordinary, as he is meticulous in keeping his greenhouse clean and disease free, as as a grower, his plants are strong and health, and his selection is unparraelled.  One of the only sources in the US that I know for for many of the Cyclamen species on his list.  I was able to stock up on my favorite species - Cyclamen graces ssp. anatolicum and C. graces. ssp. candicum ( Sorry, I kind-of bought all of them!).

A FEW OF THE CYCLAMEN SEEDLINGS PURCHASED FROM JOHN LONSDALE, AN EXPERT GROWER AND COLLECTOR FROM PENNSYLVANIA. CYCLAMEN LEAVE ARE SO VARIABLE, MOST OF THESE ARE HARDY FORMS, BUT A FEW ARE NOT, PARTICULARLY THE ONES AT THE TOP OF THIS IMAGE - CYCLAMEN GRAECUM SSP. CANDICUM, A TYPE WHERE THE BOTH THE FOLIAGE AND THE FLOWERS REMAINS SHORT IN CONTAINERS.


THIS PRIMULA ELATIOR WAS ONE I WANTED TO GET A PIECE OF - I WILL HAVE TO BEG AMY OLMSTED FROM VERMONT FOR A PIECE!


Then, Nurseryman Harvey Wrightman stayed with us s a house guest this past weekend. We always enjoy having Harvey and sometimes his wife Irene visits with us whenever they can. This time, Irene had to stay back in New Brunswick, Canada to help get plants ready for Harvey's trip out to the NARGS meeting in Ann Arbor, MI later this week. I'm triving there too, of course, but I don't envy his drive back up to Canada, and then back out the Michigan. I was thrilled to also have our dear friends from Toronto, Bella and Barbara visit. They came down to see the two shows, and to visit with us and Ellen Hornig, the former owner of the no closed nursery Seneca Hill.  Today (on Sunday), we had Bella and Barbara back over to the house so that they could spend a few hours with us as I just HAD to see some of their incredible photos from their 5 weeks exploring and botanizing in Patagonia this past winter. I think they were not-so-subtly trying to convince me to go too.∫


THERE WERE MORE AURICULA PRIMROSES AT THIS YEARS NATIONAL PRIMROSE SHOW THAN I HAVE EVER SEEN. AND THE CROWDS WERE HUGE AT TOWER HILL BOTANIC GARDEN, MAKING THE WEEKEND A SUCCESS FOR ALL ATTENDEES.



PALE YELLOW AURICULA'S ALWAYS CAPTURE MY ATTENTION

OUR TROUGHS AMAZE ME, EVEN AFTER A WINTER SUCH AS THE ONE WE HAD THIS PAST YEAR, EVEN THOUGH THE SNOW JUST MELTED, THIS ALPINE PRIMULA MARGINATA BLOOMED ON SCHEDULE.

THE PRIMULA DENTICULATA IN THE BACK GARDEN LOOKED PERFECT FOR OUR GARDEN PARTY AND TOUR ON FRIDAY NIGHT.

SOME OF MY PRIMULA DENTICULATA FROM THE HIMALAYAS - I DECIDED TO NOT DIG ANY FOR THE SHOW THIS YEAR, THEY JUST LOOKED SO NICE IN THE GARDEN. THIS DRUMSTICK PRIMROSE IS ONE OF MY FAV'S

ON THE BENCH, THERE WERE PLENTY OF P. DENTICULATA, SO I DIDN'T FEEL BAD NOT DIGGING ANY UP.

EVEN THE JULIAE PRIMROSES, A CREEPING, SPREADING VARIETY WERE BOUNTIFUL AT THIS SHOW. I WISH I COULD GROW THESE A NICE AS THIS!


WHEN YOU SEE DAFFODILS ARRANGED LIKE THIS, IT"S EASY TO PICK OUT ONES FAVORITES. I MADE A LONG LOST OF MUST-GET VARIETIES.

THE PINK ONES WHERE EXTRA SPECIAL

I LOST THE NAME OF THIS ONE ON THE LEFT, WITH A SPLIT CORONA. ANY IDEAS WHICH ONE IT IS?

I AM A SUCKER FOR DEEP ORANGE OR DARK GOLDEN FORMS. THIS ONE WAS NAMED 'LIGHTNING FIRE'

THE BLOSSOMS ON THIS ONE WERE HUGE, AND IT'S NAME MADE IT MORE COMPELLING ' SPIDER WOMAN'

GREEN DAFFODILS ARE SO NICE AND RARE, BUT THIS ONE WAS CRAZY!' RIP VAN WINKLE' USED TO BE CLASSIFIED AS A MINIATURE, BUT NOT LONGER.

SOMETIMES, CATALOGS ENHANCE THE COLOR OF SOME FLOWERS, BUT THIS ONE IS REALLY AS GREEN AS THIS - MEET 'MESA VERDE'.
A COLLECTION OF MINIATURE DAFFODILS EXHIBITED BY A NANTUCKET GROWER

April 26, 2015

EXERCISING PATIENCE WITH SPRING, AND DIVIDING DAHLIAS



I should have called this post 'biting my tongue' - so can someone please tell me when it became OK for garden centers to sell plants before the frost free date? Not all nurseries, mind you, since the good ones are smart, and care about both their customer and their plants, but the larger ones - the commercial big box garden centers like the Home Depot and Lowes around us in central Massachusetts all have their tender annuals out - salvia, tomatoes, marigolds, celosia, geraniums, impatiens - don't get me started. Our frost-free date is nearly one month away, and the soil for tomatoes, eggplant and most other warm weather crops needs to be 55º or warmer, which won't occur here until the end of May at the earliest. It's just ashamed, as it snowed this week here and the past two nights dipped into the high 20º's, which brought a long line of people complaining to out local Home Depot today. I suppose, it's one way to learn.


Tomatoes, peppers and some snapdragons await transplanting this weekend. These will be upgraded into 2.5 inch pots. No need to rush, even though nurseries are already selling tomato seedlings with blooms on them. It's far too early here.

I do understand the issue here, though. I too am eager to get gardening, but I've learned over the past 45 years or so of starting tomatoes, to wait - even later and later, sowing my seed around the end of April ( see above) and learning to keep my tomato and pepper seedlings warm (near 75º) both day and night, and I've learned from commercial growers, that even shifts in night and day temperatures can stunt tomatoes, and peppers in particular can be damages by temperature shifts ( iron deficiency = yellow leaves and stunted growth, no matter how much you feed them). The best answer is under lights, warm and safe until mid May. By doing this, I get healthier seedlings with large root systems and large leaves, and I get tomatoes about 3 weeks earlier than my neighbors - many of whom bought pre started seedlings that were much larger than mine, but they just planted them out too early.


That nice white amaryllis that I bought for Christmas bloom, had just decided to bloom. Three more are on their way.

 I can understand garden centers and nurseries loosing money with long, drawn-out colder-than-normal, or shall I say 'seasonally normal spring temperatures, as we are experiencing this year. We have only knocked on the 70º temperature once this spring, and last week it snowed a bit two days in a row. I've been delaying taking plants out of the greenhouse this year, and thankfully, it's payed off -for we've dipped below freezing for three days now, and I've had to keep the hear on in the greenhouse. Even my camellias have not been brought out yet - because their tender new shoots are just too soft.

Many of the clivia in my collection were damaged by the freeze when the greenhouse heater short circuited last January - this one, I just found today under a bench. I almost threw it out due to its damaged foliage, but I think it might be worth keeping, don't you think?

I enjoy springs like this, as most gardeners do - a slow wakening is good for the garden, but even the greenhouse is slow this year. It may be because of our long, long, cold and snowy winter, or perhaps because of the big freeze I had in January which apparently did damage many plants which did not look damaged at first (probably root damage). The clivia which always bloom in early February are just blooming, the lachenalia, amaryllis and most of the camellias are just reaching peak bloom as well.



One of my favorite crosses from ten years ago - we call it 'Muggle Drops', after our late dog, Margaret.



I wanted to share this rare, heirloom double hyacinth 'General Kohler' which was sent to me as a gift by Old House Gardens this past fall. I came home one day and found this box full of interesting bulbs sent by Scott, the owner of Old House Gardens - I have not had a chance to write about these bulbs, but as they bloom, I will share the images. Thanks Scott! That was very generous.

Back the the nurseries for a second, Joe and I always say to each other that we probably could not own a garden center this time of year, since we probably would not have many customers - as the competition would 'eat us alive'. Clearly, pansies and early veg crops would not be enough - for as we discovered last weekend at Mahoney's Garden Center near Boston, a large establishment where we saw and heard staff giving advice such as "Oh sure, those Martha Washington Geraniums will bloom all summer long as long as you keep the old flowers snipped off", or today at our local Home Depot in Auburn, MA, where a sales person was caught telling a customer that " Yes, those English Daisies will bloom all summer long and will come up for years and years". We drove to another nursery where a woman asked a sales person "Will this do well in a hanging basket?" as she held a large pot of Monarda. "Oh sure, as long as you pinch it" the sales person told her. I then watched an Indian couple who clearly were new to gardening, buy a flat of cilantro - already bolted and going to seed along with some eggplant and tomato seedlings (it was 34º outside). I stepped in an intervened.



I am no pro when it comes to Dahlias - still learning here. I have grown them for many years, but I tend to be lazy about digging them in the autumn, but last year, after growing some very nice cut flower varieties so popular on flower farms - those with pom pom flowers or smaller blooms, and I not only didn't get sick of them by autumn, I wanted to save and divide them for the following year. Always good to save some money.

Cut with a sharp knife, I've kept many tubers together on this one, as cutting any thinner would only weaken the plant. I will trim the stems to about 3 each once the pot is underway.

Dahlias can be divided shortly after digging them, when the eyes are visible, or in the spring which is when I prefer to do it. Large clumps can be difficult to manage, especially if them have a lot of tubers connects and intertwined with each other. Most experts advise dividing them earlier. As you can see, the eyes are starting to swell - like potatoes, and it's time to cut the tubers so that each has a piece of the original stem, as this is the only place where eyes will emerge. You will have waste - tubers without a large enough piece of the original stem base, or tubers which are nice, firm and large, but with not part of the original stem. These will never form eyes, and will need to be tossed.


When you save your own tubers you can keep four or five tubers together, which will give you a much stronger plant than those grown from just a single tuber, which is what you usually get from a mail order house.

I do keep single tubers, however, as long as they have a piece of the original stem base as this one does. It has a couple of buds or eyes already emerging on it. This is about the average size one gets from a mail order nursery, so that is OK.

I never mentioned it, but the week the Fergus died, our Lydia had puppies - I know, the circle of life, right? She is just weaning them (they already have teeth!) so this may the one of the last days that she is feeding them as they have already moved onto solid food.


While we are on the subject of tubers - potatoes are being rescued from the kitchen baskets, cut up and being planted out into the garden this week.

April 23, 2015

ROCK GARDENING SOCIETIES - BEYOND ROCKS - A SPECIAL GIVEAWAY


NATIVE PLANTS SHINE IN THIS WATER-WISE ROCK GARDEN IN SANTE FE ON A TOUR WITH THE NORTH AMERICAN ROCK GARDEN SOCIETY - A SOCIETY WHICH CAN HELP YOUR UNDERSTAND THAT ROCK GARDENS ARE NOT REALLY ALL ABOUT ROCKS.

Mention the term 'Rock Garden' and most people will offer a different definition. Even amongst the most passionate of rock gardening enthusiasts - member of the NARGS - the North American Rock Garden Society or the AGS - the Alpine Garden Society in the UK, even within the chatty, active chat rooms and forums of the very active and passionate SRGC - the Scottish Rock Garden Club folks disagree on what the exact definition is, but one thing is for certain - rock gardening has less to do about rocks, as it does about the plants - for each personal definition does provide a hint to what rock gardening is today - a hobby or interest which demands more than some basic knowledge about plant life. The art and science of rock gardening errs more on the side of science, ecology and botany than it does the 'art' part of the equation.


TROUGH CULTURE IS A VERY SPECIFIC TYPE OF ROCK GARDEN WHERE HIGH ELEVATION ALPINE PLANTS ARE GROWN IN HYPER-TUFA CONTAINERS MADE OF A SPECIAL BLEND OF CONCRETE THAT MIMIC'S TUFA ROCK - A HIGHLY POROUS LIMESTONE ROCK THAT MANY ALPINES GROW WELL ON, BUT THE TERM TROUGH CAN MEAN MUCH MORE THAN THESE 'SINK-LIKE' CONTAINERS.


Not that aesthetics aren't important to rock gardeners, far from it, but rock gardening is about as far away from landscape design or outdoor decoration as a garden can get. In a nut shell, it's more like recreating nature - think: habitat creation. Many rock gardens are like tiny zoo's for plants. Want to raise a rare, high elevation saxifrage from the Alps? Then you will need to recreate the alpine conditions as best you can right in your own back yard - right down to the perfect drainage, soil pH and rocky outcroppings or screes where the specific genus once grew in nature. It's a bit like creating a living diorama from a natural history museum - perhaps right in a small trough sitting on your deck, which is kind-of cool once you start thinking about it, right?

PURISTS IN THE ROCK GARDEN SOCIETIES STILL ENJOY ATTEMPTING TO GROW THE MOST CHALLENGING OF PLANTS - HIGH ELEVATION ALPINES SUCH AS THIS SAXIFRAGE SPECIES I SHOT IN ONE OF MY TROUGHS, BUT ROCK GARDENING TODAY CAN MEAN SO MUCH MORE.

Although many rock gardeners focus strictly on alpine plants in the UK, in the US the boundaries blur between interests - ferns, woodland plants, bulbs, shrubs, cacti and succulents and true, high-elevation alpines. So even though the first rock garden movement in the 1910's, kick-started by a British plantsman and explorer Reginald Farrer  -  the 'Father of Rock Gardening' -as he he ignited the trend back in the Victorian era and it grew into a specialist favorite throughout the first half of the 20th century. Near the end of the 20th century, the trend started to wane, to evolve into what rock garden is today - more about interesting plants and the people who crave them, than anything else. Some of use still raise proper rock gardens in the English style, others, do it with a twist, raising plants in troughs, raised beds or pots.

ONE OF THE BENEFITS OF JOINING A ROCK GARDEN SOCIETY IS THE SOCIAL ASPECT, TOURS, LECTURES, TALKS, ROUND-TABLES, PLANT AND SEED EXCHANGES AND CONVENTIONS. THIS TOUR IN NEW MEXICO WAS ORGANIZED BY NARGS LAST YEAR, AND INCLUDED HIKES, STUDIES AND PLENTY OF CHATTY MEALS.

That all said, 'Rock Gardening' expland into many tangential specialist groups including the Penstemon Society, the Primrose Society and many other highly specialized groups based around a single genus. Then, there is California and the water shortage, where rock gardening may mean a water-wise gravel or sand garden. Similarly, in Arizona, it may mean a cactus garden or a Steppe garden, or  in Colorado and Utah a mixture of all three. In the North East, it may mean getting rid of your lawn and introducing native plants.

There is still an identity issue here to those trying to wrap their arms around what rock gardening actuall is, but there is one thing clear to all rock gardeners - a rock garden is not simply a garden of rocks. It's about creating an environment or a habitat where these plants can grow, as most will sulk in a regular garden. This may mean fast drainage, protection from winter wet, or sand beds, gravel mulches or tiny crevice gardens of clay.


A VIEW OF MY RAISED ROCK WALL ROCK GARDEN WITH A MIXTURE OF LOW GROWING ALPINE BULBS, SPECIES TULIPS, DWARF EVERGREENS AND PERENNIALS. I TRY TO NOT GET TOO GEEKY ABOUT STAYING TRUE TO WHAT A TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY ROCK GARDEN MIGHT HAVE HAD IN IT, I PLANT A LITTLE OF EVERYTHING, FROM ANNUALS TO TREES AND BULBS. I NEVER HAVE TO WATER IT.

Even nurseries and garden centers are confused, often clumping together various low-growing or dwarf plants in areas and labeling them as 'rock garden' plants. There are only a handful of true alpine plant nurseries in North America, but as the term broadens to include woodland and shrubs and grasses, you can begin to see that a rock garden enthusiast could find a suitable rock garden plant in many aisles of a nursery, but the purist would most likely need to either join a local club, or order plants from a specialist nursery as few garden centers carry any rock plant beyond a sempervivum or a dwarf campanula.

WE DECIDED TO ELIMINATE THE LAWN IN OUR FRONT YARD, WHICH NOW LOOKS LIKE NEW YORK's HI-LINE MEETS THE NETHERLANDS, BUT EVERYTHING IN IT CAME FROM INSPIRATION I RECIEVED FROM NARGS MEETINGS, EVEN THIS BLACK, DWARF IRIS, WHICH I BOUGHT AT A NARGS PLANT SALE.


In many ways, the North American Rock Garden Society is stuck with a very unfortunate name.  It may have been appropriate in 1930, but today, it can be misleading. First, the idea of a 'society' is limiting and off-putting to some, then there are the words North and American - it used to be called the American Rock Garden Society, but once again, Canada is left to fend for itself, so the name was changed. Even so, North America is limiting as well, especially as NARGS is a global society now. The word 'Rock' has many believing that rocks are essential to rock gardens ( and in many, they are), but as you can see here - rocks are only part of the story.  What about bulbs, ephemerals, woodland plants, wildflowers, prairie grasses or ferns and mosses?

Clearly, this is simply a PR and identity issue more than anything else. We should be smart enough to be able to overcome such issues, but changing names of large organizations is challenging, and although acronyms seem to only make the matter worse (NARGS…really?), the future of these groups weighs more on the members and what they believe in more than it does what they are 'in to'. It's safe to say that NARGS, AGS and SRGC attracts the most intellectual of the plant people, sure, but it also attracts those who are curious, smart, adventurous and who love learning more about plants.

A GROUP OF NARGS MEMBERS MEET ON A SATURDAY FOR A BOTANIZING HIKE. USUALLY THERE ARE A COUPLE OF INFORMED LEADERS, AND EVERYONE ELSE TAKES NOTES AND INSPIRATION. THESE ARE ALWAYS A GREAT TIME FOR NOVICES AND EXPERTS ALIKE.

Of all the benefits that are worthy with these groups, by far, the best part of membership are the sed exchanges. Annually, each of these clubs offered members a long, long list of fresh seed - seeds available from no where else - forget about saving heirloom tomatoes - what about an endangered plant from Brazil who's habitat has been destroyed, thought to be extinct? I want to save THAT seed. Not a bean that I am saving because of some crazy, unfounded GMO fear. Make a difference in the world.

MY LOCAL CHAPTER, THE NEW ENGLAND CHAPTER A COUPLE OF WEEKS AGO, WHERE THE LUNCH-TIME TALK WAS ON GESNERIADS WHICH ARE ALPINES. YOU MIGHT THINK THAT THIS WAS TOO INTENSE, BUT EVEN FIRST-TIME ATTENDEES WHERE ENGAGED AND MADE MUST-GET LISTS, 

Attend any NARGS meeting ( there are many regional clubs that you can join, or you can simply join the national organization of NARGS, which, some full disclosure here,  I am currently the president of NARGS, something of which I am proud of, even though I still feel a bit inadequate in the role.  Attend any local or even the national annual meeting ( in two weeks???) and  you will find a cheerful, friendly group of plant enthusiasts who welcome both newbies and experts.  You just need to be curious and open about learning new things. Friends tell me that attending meetings is a little bit of boy scout meets a college lecture.


THE BRITISH SOCIETIES ARE VERY SOPHISTICATED ABOUT HOW AND WHAT ALPINES TO GROW, AND I TRY OCCASIONALLY TO IMITATE THEM IN THIS ALPINE HOUSE COLLECTION OF POTTED, TRUE ALPINES AND SMALL BULBS. NOT FOR EVERYONE, BUT I REALLY ENJOYED THE CHALLENGE.

My love for rock gardening and alpine plants started early in life, when I was a gardener at a small estate here in my home town which happened to have an extensive rock garden, tufa rock walls and an important collection of true rock plants. I just never took it all very seriously until I was much older, when about 20 years ago I started visiting some of the British sites - the Alpine Garden Society in the UK , in particular, as well as the Scottish Rock Garden Club. Both have deep sites where they share many  photos of their shows which happen it seems, every other week. No one can grow alpines in pots as well as those in the UK can, but believe me, I try. Just check out their show reports here - the Scottish ROck Garden Club imges are here.  Ian Young's bulb log was the inspiration for my blog, he and his wife Margaret are both active members of the Scottish club, you just have to visit his extensive collection of images on his bulb log here. It is insane!

THE PLANT SHOWS OF ROCK GARDEN PLANTS IN THE UK ARE SPECTACULAR. MOST GROWERS RAISE THEIR ALPINE IN POTS AND IN ALPINE HOUSES, WHICH ARE ESSENTIALLY COLD GREENHOUSES. ALPINE HOUSES ARE DIFFICULT TO KEEP HERE IN THE US, BUT MANY OF US TRY.




I kind-of knew that I could not raise such plants here in the US, but I have tried - unfortunately, our climate doesn't' cooperate in most of the US (unless one lives in Alaska or the North West), but I tried, and continue to try to raise alpine-type plants in pots and containers. I brought a few of these to my first NARGS meeting where I quietly entered them into a show - basically, a folding table near a window in an all-purpose room our local chapter rented at a state park. Most meetings occur monthly, and some include an opportunity for 'show and tell', where members can bring in a pot or even a cutting of a precious plant, and members talk about it - sharing how they grew it. There is usually coffee and treats, and then a presentation of some sort, usually a guest speaker. A great way to spend a Saturday.

FORMER NURSURY OWNER AND PLANTSWOMAN ELLEN HORNIG, THE PRESIDENT OF MY LOCAL CHAPTERS AUCTIONS OFF A RARE MONOGRAPH ON THE GENUS GALANTHUS (SNOWDROPS) AT OUR LAST MEETING. I LEFT WITH ABOUT 25 BOOKS! THE TABLE IN BACK WAS A SHOW AND TELL OF MEMBERS PLANTS. IT WAS MARCH, AND MANY PLANTS WERE LATE THIS YEAR.


It was at this first meeting when I realized that although I knew so little about these plants, that everyone was taking notes, laughing, sharing stories about how they killed something, or triumphed with it.  There was a plant auction ( it was spring) and members brought in plants that they grew or divided at home ( a note about this - NARGS members run the full gamut, from novice to expert - and it's these experts, which most chapters have in one way or another, that make membership so special - in this way, NARGS is not unlike an elite country club.

At this first meeting, I met and became friends with Darrelll Probst, the then epimedium expert who offered up few flats of rare plants that he raised from seed that he collected on expeditions to China with Dan Hinkley. These were amazing, to say the least - I mean, podophyllum that were just too precious or rare to sell to commercial nurseries like Plant Delights because he only had ten of them - each plant made me want to empty my bank account. " This white dwarf Iris came from my last expedition to China, we are not sure about the taxonomy, the species may be new to science, it's only 8 inches high, and covered itself with white Iris blossoms early in the year,  super hardy and it makes a huge mound - no one has it yet, so I'll start the bidding off at $5 - any takers?). Crazy.

At the same meeting, I met chapter members allium expert Mark McDonough, bulb expert Russell Stafford of Odyssey Bulbs and the speaker who spoke on water-wise sand beds. I bought a beautiful hyper-tufa trough and a few flats of woodland plants, bulbs and alpines, a small Daphne shrub that a member started from seed ( a species which was hard to find) and I bought a tall stack of old journals that another member was selling. Throw in a few books from the chapter library that would be lucky to every show up on Amazon, and I was hooked.

I couldn't wait for the next meeting - but I had to wait for an entire month! How could I ever survive?
NARGS is like that. Nothing at all like what my mother said rock gardening was about - rocks, placed in a garden. Ha.

THE PAGES IN THE CURRENT JOURNAL OF NARGS SHOWS THE DIVERSITY OF WILD PLANTS IN NATURE, FROM PATAGONIAN OXALIS  TO RARE PRIMROSES NOT IN CULTURE YET AND POPPIES FROM THE HIMALAYA. TELL ME - WHAT MAGAZINE FOR $35 OFFERS THIS SORT OF CONTENT TODAY 4 TIMES A YEAR? AND AT THE SAME TIME, OFFERS SEEDS OF MANY OF THESE PLANTS?


Don't get me wrong, there are plenty of rocks in rack gardens - in particular, tufa rock, a porous limestone rock treasured by rock gardeners for true alpines, as they can root directly into the rock, but it is difficult to come by, and if you do, it is expensive. Hyper-tufa is a concrete mix, I think you've all seen it - people use it to make troughs or bowls in which to plant alpine plants.  You may remember it being used in some classic Martha Stewart Living TV episodes, or from a few DIY craft blogs. If done right, it can look very much like rock, and it is the preferred method for creating troughs, a very specific type of alpine garden where high elevation plants are raised in carefully constructed troughs which mimic the stone sinks early rock garden enthusiasts used in England, but if done poorly, it could look like dinosaur poop.


TROUGHS, WHICH ORIGINALLY WERE WHAT FARRER  CALLED SINK GARDENS IN 1900, ARE GAINING POPULARITY - EVEN IN THE SOUTH WEST - WHERE THIS ONE THRIVES IN THE SHADE OF A PINON PINE.

Regardless of how you define rock gardening or what a rock garden is, the art and science of it makes sense, as explained in a nice post on the NPR blog this week - where the author has shared some interesting thoughts about how relevant rock gardening can be today.


A SPREAD FOR THE CURRENT JOURNAL OF THE NORTH AMERICAN ROCK GARDEN SOCIETY, THE ROCK GARDEN QUARTERLY FEATURING AN ARTICLE ON PLANTS FROM AFGHANISTAN AND MUCH MORE. THIS IS CLEARLY NOT GARDEN DESIGN MAGAZINE OR WILDER, BUT IT SURELY HAS SUBSTANCE.


MY VERY SPECIAL GIVE AWAY

So in an effort to promote rock gardening or alpine gardens, I am offering two precious copies of the latest journal of NARGS to two randomly selected readers who leave comments on this post - how great is that? In this issue, you will see articles on plants from expeditions to Afghanistan, to China, and Patagonia, but mostly, I hope that you will see that rock gardening is more about discovering the wonder of some of the most special plants in the world, be they endangered or threatened, curious or odd, or simply rare and undiscovered.

I AM OFFERING A GIVEAWAY TO TWO WINNERS - THE LATEST ISSUE OF THE ROCK GARDEN QUARTERLY, THAT I HELPED REDESIGN - NORMALLY ONLY AVAILABLE TO MEMBERS OF NARGS. BETTER YET, JOIN!


All this said about rock gardens because our national Annual Meeting is being held in a couple of weeks in Ann Arbor. Hey, you could always attend and really get introduced to the whole scheme - I am bringing a couple of friends who have never been. If not, then at least check the NARGS sites for a local chapter of NARGS website here, and attend the next meeting - I promise you that people will welcome yo - tell them I sent you, and maybe you will be so inspired that you will join this great plant society that has such a long and respected history.


ALL SORTS OF INTERESTING ARTICLES COME IN THIS PRESTIGIOUS JOURNAL, FOUR TIMES A YEAR.