}

September 4, 2012

Planting Fall Vegetables - Sponsored by a Super Fall Carhartt Sale

Nothing comes between me and my well-worn Carhartt Dungaree's. Well, maybe TMI, but this superb felt container with Thai Basil sure makes a better male model that I do! The purple flowers are as nice as hydrangeas. Next year, I am growing a border of this variety which is called 'Siam Queen'
As the season shifts, the vegetable garden can either lie ratty and weedy for the remainder of the season, or, I could plant a fall crop or two. I've chosen the later, the third crop in this tiny raised bed that sits closest to the kitchen. It has provided us with an early spring crop of green onions, white turnips, arugula, and green mustard. In late June, I planted a crop of zucchini, dill and cilantro. Now, the squash is just about over ( well, it wasn't but I was sick of it), and I am preparing the bed for a fall crop of lettuce and Chinese Cabbage. Pansy seedlings will be transplanted along the edges soon, but they are still in the seed tray. They will spend the winter under a bed of hay ( the proper way to grow spring pansies). 

September 3, 2012

Repotting Succulents as Summer Ends

THE URN THAT I PLANTED WITH SCRAP SUCCULENT CUTTINGS COLLECTED FROM PLANTS THAT WERE TOSS-AWAY's  AROUND THE GREENHOUSE, HAS FILLED IN NICELY - NOW I CAN EXTRACT EACH CUTTING AND REPOT THEM INTO COMMUNITY POTS OR INDIVIDUAL CONTAINERS FOR A WINTER IN THE GREENHOUSE.
As we swing into autumn, at least meteorologically speaking, many of the potted plants that have spent the summer outdoors, need some attention before being brought back indoors, or back into the greenhouse.. The many succulents and cacti, euphobia, aloe, gasteria, and other succulents need some attentions, particularly the ones which I allows to grow into specimen plants - those mounding, clumping and tight-growing clustering species that form buns and mounds.  These seem to need more attention than other succulents, as they often attract weeds like Oxalis which needs to be frequently pulling out with tweezers, and these plants often need repotting, with fresh soil, and a fresh top dressing of gravel, to help keep the soil surface away from the plant - this discourages rot.

September 2, 2012

Who's your tiger? Tigridia, of course - if only briefly.

TIGIRIDA PAVONIA, A MEXICAN TENDER BULB OPENS IT'S WIDE GRAPHIC PETALS ONLY BRIEFLY, DURING THE SUNNIEST PART OF THE DAY.

This plant seems like an appropriate subject for a post on Labor Day here in the United States? Here is a flower which can only be seen open between the hours of 8:00 am and 4:00 PM - basically, seem only by those with night jobs, or by those who don't work. Tigridia pavonia, or Mexican Shell Flower is one of those bulbs seen more often in catalogs, than in actual gardens, and if you do plant some bulbs in the spring, they most likely will open for a single day, and close shut well before you arrive home from work. Tigridia is rarely seen grown well, for it requires a thick planting with hundreds of bulbs in a border to ever look like anything, and few people have the means to dedicate an entire bed or border to a Mexican bulb that only blooms for a couple of weeks in late August during vacation time. Still, I dream of such a border, planted thickly with Tigridia, if only for the wow effect.

TIGRIDIA AVAILABLE IN SPRING BULB CATALOGS COME FROM HOLLAND, WHERE STOCKS ARE RAISED FOR THE GLOBAL BEDDING MARKET. COLORS VARY WIDELY, FROM YELLOW, TO PINK, WHITE AND RED.