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October 26, 2014

BULBS, FLOWERS, FRUIT AND SQUASH


NERINE SARNIENSIS - 'INCHEMERY KATE'

I so wanted to attend the tri-state NARGS Rock Garden meeting and plant show this weekend at the New York Botanical Garden but I just couldn't get there without sacrificing planting bulbs, planting garlic and digging dahlia tubers which simply could not wait until next weekend.  I am certain that I missed a great event, but next year I will work on attending it as a priority ( if it is held every year - I need to check on that!). Just in case I did go, I would have brought this fabulous pot of Nerine sarniensis 'Inchemery Kate', but alas, it sits on the deck waiting to be brought back into the greenhouse to be seen by nobody. So, I thought that I would share a photo of it here. The Guy Wolff pot is one of my favorites, so I will repot it later, saving the pot for one of the amaryllis which arrived this week. Those, I will be repotting next weekend.


A RARE VARIEGATED CHRISTMAS CACTUS BLOOMING IN THE GREENHOUSE I HAVEN'T DECIDED IF I LIKE IT YET, BUT NOW THAT IT HAS FLOWERED - I HAVE TO ADMIT THAT IT IS KIND-OF NICE


A few amaryllis are already beginning to emerge so I had to pot them up. Always good to have a few in bloom early, I suppose. I also planted a few varieties of Ixia, the South African corm with long, grass like foliage and wiry wands on flowers in late winter, as well as a few pots of Babiana hybrids or selections that I found on-line. Many bulbs have been potted this year, including lots of new lachenalia African beauty series, the hybrid selections which are so beautiful in mid winter, and more narcissus, crocus and Ipheon for spring bloom under glass. I probably over did it this year, but I do have a commitment to enter the new Spring bulb and flower show at the Tower Hill Botanic Garden in late February ( you should plan on entering a few pots too!).


THE SPANISH NARCISSUS INCLUDE MANY AUTUMNAL BLOOMING ONES, AND THIS LITTLE BEAUTY IS A FAVORITE - BUT I ONLY HAVE ONE BULB! FOR TEN YEARS NOW IT BLOOMS ALL ALONE IN ITS LITTLE POT. I REALLY NEED TO GET IT SOME FRIENDS. SEED PERHAPS WILL DO IT FOR ME.

WINTER SQUASH - IRAN

I spent a good part of today picking up the winter squashes  from around the new garden next to the greenhouse. I should say, picking up the squashes which the dogs did not think were doggy toys! I suppose who could blame them, with their bright colors and bumpy goodness, these squashes are pretty irresistible. I tried about a half dozen of old selections and varieties, some dating back to the 1600's - oh so New England, but where they really perform in in the kitchen. Most of these Curcurbita maxima selections make the best pumpkin pie (remember - one should never use field pumpkins as all pumpkins are C. pepo - far too watery and fiberous). Opt for a hubbard squash or Butternut ( which is C. moschata) but that's ok. It makes a fine pie. No commercial canned pumpkin mix used true orange pumpkins. Always a good tip to know.

THIS FRENCH 'PATISSON STRIE MELANGE' IS ACTUALLY A SUMMER SQUASH, BUT WHEN ALLOWED TO MATURE, IT TRANSFORMS INTO ONE OF THE MOST ORNAMENTAL HEIRLOOMS GOURDS YOU COULD EVER IMAGINE. THIS IS LARGER THAN A DINNER PLATE. WHEN PICKEN YOUNG, IT'S A PALE GREEN SCALLOP SQUASH IN THE SUMMERTIME.





 Most winter squash need to be stored warm and dry, and not refrigerated, or below 45º F. They can remain outdoors until hard frost, but best to bring them in soon if frost threatens. Most should last until late winter, with many lasting well into next spring and summer. An aged winter squash can become more sweet and nutty over time, and many varieties are best if aged until at least December, and are not as fine when eaten fresh from the field.




Dahlia tubers freshly dug. Always good to leave some soil on them.

I've been a good boy this year, and I dug all of my dahlia tubers. Usually I just let them go, out of boredom or laziness. This year, I loved my new selection of cut flower dahlias so much that I can't even imagine leaving them in the garden. Best thing of all is that each large tuber has now grown into a larger clump of tubers. Each will need to be separated (cut) from the main stem carefully, labeled with a sharpie, and then stored in a dry medium like soilless mix or vermiculite for the winter. I will store my tuber in the cellar until next spring when they will be started again in the greenhouse. It looks like I should have many more plants of each variety, which will be nice, as my initial investment was for only one tuber of each variety. Clearly, my population has grown tenfold.


This pot has two labels, both are for a different species of Lachenalia, but these is a self seeded greenhouse 'weed' that I happen to love. The bulbous Allium scorzonerifolium can be invasive in gardens, but it is not hardy outdoors here. 

3 comments :

  1. I love your pictures! You did a lot of work!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amazing photos!!! Can you tell me what camera did you use to make them?

    ReplyDelete

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