July 10, 2012

Heirloom Cottage Annuals circa 1898

CURATING A THOUGHTFUL BLEND OF TRULY OLD-FASHIONED ANNUALS TAKES MORE THAN RESEARCH, PATIENCE AND CAREFUL CULTURAL STEWARDSHIP,  IT TAKES A DARN GOOD DOSE OF LUCK.
HERE ARE A FEW LUCKY TREASURES BLOOMING IN MY GARDEN TODAY

I found this cut-glass basket vase in the cellar store room today, it must have been my grand mothers, since it was hidden behind some of the old pickle crocks that I think have never been moved in 60 years! I thought that it deserved an appropriate bouquet of some turn-of-the-century annuals, many of which we rarely see in gardens today. 

I am more than a little frustrated with the annuals from the garden centers near me, for they have hardly grown at all since I planted them two months ago. Obviously, they've been drenched in growth retardant and have been selected to bloom early, as well as at a short height, which makes them sell ( hey, even I fell for it!) but once planted in the ground, they sulk and do nothing. This includes the marigolds, all which had large blossoms on them when I bought them, and I should have known better, and some nicotiana and snapdragons, which are no taller than 8 inches.


  1. Stock - Mathiola incana
  2. Ruby Chalice Clarkia - Clarkia rubicuna 
  3. Godetia - Clarkia amoena ssp. Whitneyi
  4. Coral Shirley Poppy - Papaver
  5. Pincushion Flower - Knautia macedonica
  6. Sweet Pea - Lathyrus odoratus
  7. Convolvulus 'Blue Ensign'
  8. Shirley Poppy - ' Sir Cedric Morris'
  9. Painted Tongue - Salpiglossis sinuata
  10. (hidden) Cabbage Rose ' Rosa species' garden origin
  11. Flax - Linum grandiflorum

As for my crop of Bell of Ireland, I failed :(  . Only two are alive, and barely, at that). Other projects this year, include my crop of Lathyrus, which so far, are doing very well, forming buds, but they are starting to get some rippled foliage - not sure if that is a virus, or, just the heat. I will provide an update on those, soon.

10 comments :

  1. Will you hate me if I tell you how amazing my bells of Ireland are looking right now? I can grow all these things pretty easily but it is much more impressive when you grow them so well.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Beautiful. I especially like the painted toungue - do they still sell that? And the coral Shirley poppy.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Beautiful! Especially the painted tongue and coral poppy! Do they still sell painted tongue

    ReplyDelete
  4. I just discovered your blog and most impressed by the storied past of your garden. I left all my extended family in Australia when I came here as a teenager. Love the arrangement and will subscribe.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Mark McGee2:24 AM

    Thank you for your article in the Pacific Bulb Society quarterly. Informative article. You need to be a full-time nurseryman and blogger!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thanks Mark - How nice would that be! But then, there would be no Furbys in the world!

    Jason - Painted Tongue seed ( Salpiglossis) can be found, not at stores, but in seed catalogs. I ordered mine from Thompson & Morgan.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Oh, and Kaveh - I don't hate you, it's me green with envy!

    ReplyDelete
  8. It is wonderful to see such ornate flowers from a special era, they remind me of my childhood, visiting my grandparents home.
    I dream of growing flowers like this and hope to aspire to this standard. I too have attempted to grow the bells of Ireland, I live in hope!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful! I've enjoyed reading your post. This cut-glass basket vase in the cellar store room is really beautiful together with the different attractive flowers. Thanks for sharing this one. Lawn Care

    ReplyDelete
  10. Thanks Irene, I never really was a fan of cut glass, but recently, I am finding some uses for it. Thanks for checking out my blog!

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Most Popular Posts