April 8, 2012

My Easter Parade


RAISED ETHNIC LITHUANIAN, EASTER IS A BIG DEAL FOR OUR FAMILY, BUT WE NEVER MADE ELABORATE EASTER EGGS, RATHER, MY MOM USED TO USE ONION SKINS AND BEETS TO COLOR EGGS FROM OUR OWN CHICKENS - THIS YEAR, I USED FOOD COLORING AND BLACK FOOD COLORING TO CREATE A MORE STYLISH COLOR PALETTE. THEN, I USED A TOOTHBRUSH TO SPECKLE THEM WIDE ENDS. 




A PARADE OF SMALL SPRING BULBS AND EPHEMERALS, HELLEBORE. POLEMONIUM, ANEMONE RANUNCULOIDES, LEUCOJUM VERNALIS, CHINODOXA, MUSCARI, ANEMONE BLANDA ALL JOIN THE PARADE FOR OUR EASTER A TABLE.
Just a few images from our Easter Sunday. I had these vintage white Fire King spice jars that I received from my friend Cheryl sitting as part of a collection, but I never used them for anything practical. Since our table is long ( 16 feet) and has a white tablecloth, the white milk glass seemed perfect to use since there are so many tiny bulbs and treasures blooming right now in the garden. 

I too four days off from work, and I thought that I would be able to blog more, but alas, not. Too much garden work, housework and Joe's surgery- nothing serious but it left him with a 2 inch hole in his stomach that need to be packed with gauze twice a day and kept sterile which means no garden work for him.  With 18 guests for a sit down dinner, I think I spent more time cooking than I did working in the garden, but there will be more weekends in the future. I did get to plant sweet peas ( some of them) and transplanted some early annuals into the garden. Spring is arriving full force, it seems.

WHITE MILK GLASS FIRE KING  SPICE CONTAINERS WITH LESSER BULBS AND EARLY EPHEMERALS FROM THE GARDEN.


2 comments :

  1. A nice post, and interesting to read how those from different cultures observe and spend their Easter. On this side of the world we are bust bedding our gardens down for winter and trying hard not to over-indulge in chocolate!

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  2. hopflower7:44 PM

    ..."Using traditional British methods such as cordons as well as newer methods such as bush training, and integration into annual and perennial borders." Hate to tell you this Matt, but bush training and integration into borders is nothing new. Maybe for you, but traditional ways for sweet peas in England include these methods. Also, there are literally many sites with info about sweet peas and growing (mostly British, of course).

    But, they are fun----and although I have been growing them for many years, I never tire of reading about them and watching others discover how amazing they are. Be sure and let us know what varieties you are growing; there are some truly superb choices in all colour families. I do hope you try Ethel Grace, Lilac Ripple, and Gwendoline.

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