May 22, 2011

The Romance of Wisteria

A VASE OF WISTERIA SCENTS AN ENTIRE ROOM AT THE HOUSE - WISTERIA MAKES A TERRIFIC CUT FLOWER, AND THEY LOOK PERFECT IN THIS VINTAGE ROSEVILLE SPANISH MOSS PATTERN, VASE.
Mastering Wisteria is easy for some, impossible for others. Many find the Wisteria cultivars and species available today to be difficult to flower, while others fear their invasiveness and aggressive behavior, but when kept in check with careful pruning, and removal of seedpods and runners, Wisteria vines offer an elegance unmatched by any other vine.

A CLOSE-UP LOOK AT THE FLOWERS, REVEALS WHY THE WISTERIA IS IN THE PEA FAMILY.
Wisteria is a relatively small genus, with ten species and many selected cultivars. Two species are native to the Unitied States, while the rest are native to China, Korea and Eastern China. Some choice Asian species bloom before their leaves emerge, while most others bloom just after the foliage arrives. Some selections have tremendously long flower stems, making the entire vine, when grown on the side of a house on a trellis, or in an old tree, look like tumbling waterfall when in bloom. I prefer vines that  are trained to a single leader while young, staked, and pruned tightly which produces an elegant" tree-like form". Often sold as 'tree Wisteria', these are actually trained vines, and although they will form a strong, muscular trunk, they remain vines, and will require frequent pruning to maintain their shape, which is easy.
A 'TREE WISTERIA', TWO YEARS OLD, BLOOMING IN THE BACK GARDEN. THIS PLANT WILL REQUIRE A FEW MORE YEARS OF GROWTH BEFORE IT DEVELOPS IT'S TRUE STATURE.
Wisteria species come in white forms, blue, purple and pink. Chinese species are less hardy than American species, but they are more fragrant. I adore the orange-blossom scent of Wisteria, and some species even have attractive seed pods. Look for plants that are dormant via mail-order, or find a reliable source for choice strains if you want dependable bloom. Plant with care, for once established, a wisteria vine is difficult to remove from the landscape. If perfectly sited, they add visual appeal and value to most any garden.

2 comments :

  1. While I agree that wisteria is beautiful and had a delicious scent, I have battled this beast in my yard since I purchased it four years ago. Someone obviously planted it in my yard a long time ago and did not take the time to maintain it. It was simply left to run wild, and boy has it done that!! The runners are never ending and simply won't die. I'm glad to see someone showing an appreciation for a beautiful vine and also appreciate that you pointed out how terribly invasive it can be. Thanks for the nice read!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anonymous7:25 AM

    Last spring I bought what I think is a miniature wisteria, or at least it was labeled as such. It took off right away and now has its first blooms trying to open. I can't wait to see what it smells like and looks like! Great information on your post!

    ReplyDelete

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Most Popular Posts