September 14, 2014

MAKING A COLOR-SAVVY LATE SUMMER DAHLIA ARRANGEMENT


Anyone who grows dahlias knows that September marks the height of the dahlia season. Armloads of dahlias means that everyone you know ends up with a bouquet, with few complaints. This year my cutting garden is looking better than it has, but since I've been traveling a lot, few flowers have yet to be picked.

When one visualizes the summer garden, especially from the perspective of a snowy, January evening, one imagines such lushness, yet forgets that such abundance can dull the experience a bit. If only one could preserve a few buckets of our coral and peach pom pom dahlias for mid-winter in some magical refrigerator, but such luxuries do not exist. We are stuck far too many dahlias and other cut flowers to enjoy on these last days of summer, so why not celebrate the bounty with a late summer arrangement.
Here is the story of the one I made today:
Click below for more.

September 13, 2014

Preserving Summer - Home Canning, Whole Tomatoes and Tomato Sauce



Tomatoes seem to know when they should ripen - and it's never at a convenient time. I've been traveling for the past three weeks ( a couple trips to both New Mexico and California for work and pleasure) but I've been home every weekend for a day or two to do laundry, re-pack and to 'put-up tomatoes, which this year, have decided to not only ripen when I am at my most busy, they have also decided to become a bit of a bumper crop (which I have no idea why, as we have had a very cold and wet summer). Really though, I am not complaining - as come this winter, we will have lots of heirloom tomatoes canned whole, crushed, sauce, salsa and stewed. Since again this weekend I am just catching up on posts, emails and yes…..tomato canning, here are some pictures from last weekend's bounty.
Click for more:

September 2, 2014

SANTE FE - BOTANIZING THE SUB ALPINE ZONES WITH NARGS MEMBERS


A just past prime Spotted Coralroot or Corallorhiza maculate blooms near the Santa Fe Basin Ski area.

One of the best things about attending a North American Rock Garden Society meeting? Well, it's hard to tell.  It might be the in-depth presentations by world class rock gardeners and botanists, or it may just be all of the amazing inspiring members who attend these annual events. The local garden tours are inspiring and impressive, as is the incredible plant sale - where some of the rarest and hard to find plants can be purchased from local nurseries, some long before most ever become available elsewhere - but I have to admit that my favorite part is the botanizing with friends -  fellow plant geeks and plant lovers. There is always the hiking on trails and subalpine meadows in and around spectacular Santa Fe, New Mexico. Honestly, I loved it all.

This year, I am so honored to announce to my readers that I have been nominated and voted in as the new president of the North American Rock Garden Society - a tremendous honor and responsibility in the plant world, and one which I intend to leverage, as I have a great affinity for all plant societies, and in this one in particular. Rock gardening is very inclusive - it covers the culture and study of high elevation alpine plants, naturally, but also includes woodland treasures, ephemerals, wild flowers and native plants, ferns, bulbs, trees and much more. Essentially, rock gardening today encompasses much more than merely rock gardens and alpine plants. The society attracts those who care about preservations, botanical diversity, wild species and native genera seed collecting and the study of many types of interesting plants. Some may consider NARGS to be an elite society, but I like to think of it as a plant society for those who really love plants, and for those who want to learn more. I encourage you all to consider a membership, to check out our beautiful color quarterly journal, and to participate in the annual NARGS seed sale. Feel free to learn more about NARGS here at our website.
Click below for more:

August 30, 2014

THE NORTH AMERICAN ROCK GARDEN SOCIETY ANNUAL MEETING IN SANTA FE



This weekend I am attending the Annual Meeting of the North American Rock Garden Society being held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Having never been to either Santa Fe or even New Mexico for that matter, I discovering why so many artists and creative people love this city. It's unique Pueblo style architecture with adobe brick and stucco is amazing, not to mention the food, the people, the weather and the chili's.

As some of you already know, I am so proud to have been elected as the new president of NARGS this weekend, and I am so excited to have been both nominated and elected into this two year term with such a respected plant group as the North American Rock Garden Society. In many ways, I feel so un qualified as there are many expert gardeners more qualified than I, as the membership includes some of of the finest botanists and plant enthusiasts of any plant group, but I understand the mission at hand - revitalizing, re-energizing and perhaps reinventing a group of smart, passionate and dedicated plant people and leading the way for a brighter future. Something many plant societies will need to address in the coming years. I cannot make many big promises, but I can and will tell the membership that I will do my very best to inspire and bring a positive energy to the group.



The adobe architecture in and around Santa Fe keeps authentic, much like parts of New England.


I am very busy here, as meetings and hikes continue every day, but I thought that I might share some images - with very little text. Enjoy!

Centranthus ruber  growing in a border in front of the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi.

Street markets around Santa Fe feature exactly what one would expect in such an alley.

NARGS members gather at a trail head for one of the many hikes, botanizing the mountains of Sangre de Christo in New Mexico.

The view from - of all things, the hot tub at one of the private homes we visited.

Many Salvia thrive in the arid, desert-like climate which still gets snow in the winter, but hot, dry drought in the summer. These plants were in the gardens at the home of a NARGS member.

This Erodium, related to the geranium, blooms in the bright shade. Not many alpine plants bloom in August, but the Erodiums do.

This Saliva azurea was stunning! I wonder if I could grow this blue beauty in my greenhouse?
A Cyclamen hederifolium in New Mexico? If sited right, many zone 5 plants can grow here if a bit of water is offered. Besides, this climate in not unlike that of Turkey or the Steppes of Asia.






August 26, 2014

AROUND THE GARDEN IN AUGUST

THIS BEAUTY IS A PINEAPPLE LILY, OR EUCOMIS VANDERMERWEI 'OCTOPUS'


As prepare to depart for Sante Fe to attend the North American Rock Garden Society annual meeting, I thought that I would share some random images from around the garden this last week of summer.


I've also started something new - writing for eHow, a site which has impressed me with how they have reinvented themselves over the past 6 months ( they no longer are a content farm guys'), in fact, they are some of the most professional and nicest people I have ever worked with. You can check out one of my posts here, a post about growing greens in the home garden for autumn and winter harvest. I'm really trying to raise the bar with these articles which obviously are targeting new and less experienced gardeners. I would love to hear what you think as I am taking a slightly more advanced approach with my content. New gardeners deserve more inspiration beyond how to grow succulents and air plants.    So it's more like: 'Go ahead - you can grow awesome Chinese Cabbage ...and here's how' as my approach. Still simplified, but not dumbed down.




Heirloom tomatoes are just beautiful. Not always tastier than hybrids, I still can't help myself in planting far more than I need. It's been a terrific year for tomatoes, which surprises me as it has been cool and damp. I have already canned 24 quarts and it isn't even Labor Day yet.


GOMPHRENA 'PINK ZAZZLE™', VIRTUALLY STEROIDAL IN SIZE, WITH FLOWERS NEARLY 2 INCHES IN DIAMETER WHICH ARE ABIOUT FOUR TIMES THE SIZE OF TYPICAL GOMPHRENA.



DAHLIAS AND CHINA ASTERS.



THE SELF-SEEDED NICOTIANA LANGSDORFII CONTINUE TO BLOOM AROUND THE WALK LEADING TO THE GREENHOUSE. THIS SPECIES IS STILL MY FAVORITE OF THE FLOWERING TOBACCO.

WE HAVE BOTH ITALIAN AND RUSSIAN BEES, OUR FRIEND JESS MADE LOGOS FOR THEM WITH HER LASER MACHINE.




OUR AGAPANTHUS ARE REACHING PEAK BLOOM, ALL ARE IN LARGE TUBS ESPECIALLY THIS WHITE SELECTION, BUT THE BLUE ONE CALLED 'STORM CLOUD' WAS DIVIDED THIS YEAR, SO IT HAS ONLY PRODUCED A FEW FLOWERS.





August 25, 2014

A VISIT WITH THE ULTIMATE PLANTSMAN, GLEN LORD

Glen checks a wisteria bonsai in his garden ( and greenhouse) in Leominster, MA

There is something reassuring about visiting another plantsman ( or plantswoman) - you know, another person who is so obsessed with collecting plants, that they often have multiple collections, which may seem random to the untrained eye, but always fascinating to the informed and equally 'ill'  collector. When two plant men get together, hours can pass just chatting about the details - soil mixes, bulb sources, recent discoveries to share. The best part? There is no need for any justification. 

So it was when I visited Glen Lord, a close friend yes, but one whom I rarely visit - because, well…he lives 20 minutes from me. Glen usually finds his way to my garden and greenhouse, sometimes I think just to refresh his collection, but in so many ways, Glens collections are so much better than mine - that I don't' see what he could possibly find at my home that would interest him.

Like many plant collectors, Glen is highly knowledgeable - a practical genus when it comes to remembering and identifying plants - he's a handy friend to have around for certain - if only to rationalize a recent purchase of a rare plant, or to bounce ideas off of. I last visited Glen about 2 years ago ( maybe 3!)  but his collection has grown (or outgrown) his Leominster, MA house and yard - I think that it might be safe to say that he will need to find a larger place to live soon, as there are only so many bonsai's one can keep on their driveway before their car needs to be parked in the street. Glens house is easy to find, for in a rather ordinary neighborhood, I quickly found it even though I was lost. Plant people are not easy to hide.

Punica 'Nochi Shibari', a gorgeous salmon and coral colored pomegranate blossom.

Glen has a fascinating job - as a Bonsai expert, he is responsible for the careful tending of the Arnold's Arboretum bonsai collection at Harvard University (safe to say that one must be a bonsai expert if one is responsible for trees which are hundreds of years old), and he makes and designs some fascinating garden tools, which I will be sharing with you soon. His garden, like so many other plant collectors, is a jumbled, organized but not really designed, botanically interesting collection. His specialty? Variegated plants, rare novelties, cacti and succulents, Japanese collectible plants ( like Rhodea, Neofinetia and Acuba) and extraordinary bonsai. Here are some images from my visit.


Punica 'Gosai Ryu' a pomegranate with bright salmon roe colored flowers, and variegated foliage.



Venus Fly Traps as a collection? Why not.


Not all pines are dull - check this one out - Pinus Tani Ma no Ykui  or Tonima no yuki. Totally not Yuki. Glen has a very extensive collection of evergreens.



Morus 'Ho 'O" a spectacular, novelty mulberry with interesting leaf growth.

Petasites japonicas purpureus, a plant that I asked glen about, and he told me that he got from us. Hmmm.. Of course, when grown in the ground and not in a bonsai pot, the leaves can be 50 time larger. I love this.

Pinus parviflora - A stately Japanese white pine bonsai

The Japanese adore Acuba selections, particularly those with variegated leaves. Glen's collection which started with many which came from Barry Yinger, has many varieties. Most spend the winter in his greenhouse.


Selaginella borealis and Spirea alpina


Schlumberger Christen Aurea Varietgata (invalid, but Glen wants to call it Blond Moment).
I would call it - Not your granny's Christmas Cactus.

Rhodea 'Seruga Nishiki'. A select variegated Rhodea, which is marginally hardy in New England, but rarely seen.


Lewesia as a bonsai.


Tucker cools off in the shade, waiting for dinner.

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Most Popular Posts